Tag Archives: Ego

The Mind Can Be Hard To Like

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Lud Dimpfl’s Sufi Mureeds (Initiated 1973)

A Diligent Student of Entertainment

It is said that I’m lazy
(I even say it)

But that’s not a fatal flaw
Not when so much of enlightenment

So much of the spiritual path
Is like a ride at Disneyland

Okay yes
I’m a diligent student of entertainment:

Of the cheap thrills of discovering
That the dark side of the moon

Is still the same potent symbol for love
(Aka beauty)

~.~.~

Hazrat Inayat Khan’s Invocation:

“Towards the one, the perfection of love, harmony and beauty, the only being, united with all the illuminated souls who form the embodiment of the master, the spirit of guidance.”

~.~.~

Hazrat Inayat Khan’s Prescribed Daily Mantra:
“My thoughtful self: Reproach no one. Bear malice towards no one. Hold a grudge against no one. Be wise, tolerant, considerate, polite, and kind to all.”

~.~.~

Gentle Readers,
First, about the photo above of my Sufi class, I am the dark guy in the back row just in front of the left (white) door jamb. The framed saying on the wall above says, “God forbid that we should ever have to bear all that we are capable of bearing.”
–Old Jewish proverb

In case any newcomers have wandered in, this is a metaphysical blog, heavily influenced by my personal experiences with Sufism (a branch of mysticism). And my Sufi exposure started from membership in a Sufi group in San Francisco (Sufism Reoriented, 1972-79) originally founded by Hazrat Inayat Khan (1882-1927)*

You must know that each day I receive a set of quotations from Hazrat Inayat Khan (You can too**).

Which often gives me ideas for new blog posts. As in today’s daily excerpt of Inayat Khan quotes:

“By a study of life the Sufi learns and practices the nature of its harmony. He establishes harmony with the self, with others, with the universe and with the infinite. He identifies himself with another, he sees himself, so to speak, in every other being. He cares for neither blame nor praise, considering both as coming from himself. If a person were to drop a heavy weight and in so doing hurt his own foot, he would not blame his hand for having dropped it, realizing himself in both the hand and the foot. In like manner the Sufi is tolerant when harmed by another, thinking that the harm has come from himself alone. … He overlooks the faults of others, considering that they know no better. He hides the faults of others, and suppresses any facts that would cause disharmony. His constant fight is with the Nafs (the self-centered ego), the root of all disharmony and the only enemy of man.”

But this raises an interesting question. “Suppress facts?” Isn’t that a slippery slope? Or if harmony-seeking is your North Star, maybe it cuts through all the exception objections. The mind as we know, is always clever both at interpreting stuff in ways to undercut any attempt to bring it under control, and as well is clever at covering its tracks, when wreaking its will*** (e. g. like as not in this case, denouncing the repression of facts as an unscientific and dishonest practice. And next thing you know, calling the heart a hypocrite).

Which is a good reason for trusting more ones intuition than one’s reasoning faculties, which can be misled. But intuition . . . what a useful thing! Of course you must pardon me here; I am biased toward art forms. Who knows? Maybe that’s why I gravitated to this branch of Sufism. ****

God Be With You,
Eric Halliwell

PS—this blog was started in 2013, and so there is a vast accumulation of blog posts, which I imagine my current followers by and large either haven’t seen or have forgotten. And this sort of thing (these themes) is inherently timeless. And so I have decided to occasionally reprise a former blog post. One which I consider among my “greatest hits.” (forgive my effrontery)

Full Disclosure: I likely will rewrite them. Asi es la vida.

* (for more on Inayat Khan see: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inayat_Khan

**see this url: https://wahiduddin.net/saki/saki_new.php

***Just to give an example from my own experience. You must know we mureeds (student Sufis) were given homework. We had to meditate 15 minutes every day, stipulating it was a spiritual theme connected to our raison d’etre. Now I have to hand it to my ego how cleverly it would derail my fifteen minute meditation. Clever because to have interjected some low desire or delicious bit of sarcasm about someone I didn’t like, etc. would have appalled me, a sincere student. But my ego would derail the spiritual theme with some really useful train of thought like a great invention for quickly making large quantities of homemade yogurt. (I did you know. I could go into business and make a bundle if I A. weren’t too lazy and B wasn’t busy with this blog, etc.) You know, really useful and “innocent” stuff. But it was like a sacrifice fly in the ointment of my meditation attempts. As another for instance, maybe I would get an epiphany about a solution to a problem I had been pondering, e. g. how to keep my melons from rotting on the ground. (Put them on a matt of straw!) Yes it’s worldly not spiritual (though I could argue that everything is spiritual at least in that the long way around proves the shortest way home. Hence reincarnation. But I digress.

Of course that was at least through a useful (but note, unspiritual) distraction, though worldly. But worldly was preferable to this bit of less subtle chicanery my mind pulled. Yes, I do remember an intransigent and domineering ego like when I was supposed to be imagining my breath as a swing back and forth. Well perversely my mind wouldn’t play along. Either it would do it out of rhythm like such as would cause hyperventilation, or more memorably, just bring the swing to a sudden halt. (The mind can be hard to like)

****My branch of Sufism was founded by Moinuddin Chishti , (1142–1236).and is one of four main branches of Sufism. I confess I can’t remember the other three. Perhaps becaused I am a Chisti chauvinist. Being an art lover will do that to you, because a distinguishing feature of the Chisti branch is it brought the arts into the service of (Dre I cll it god? Some fine people I have noticed aare pit off by the term. My belief is it’s due to the hypocrites who have taken over the main religions and who presume to speak for God. But it’s not a problem if you just cling to what doesn’t hurt the heart. It cuts through a lot of Gordian knots, and is reminiscent of when Jesus said, “By their fruits shall ye know them.”

Happiness Has a Small Door

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Adrienne Shamszad

Adrienne Shamszad

PR4–420

Happiness Has a Small Door

You’d think God would balk
At being manipulated
But it turns out

God will kiss your ass
If that’s what it takes
To make you happy

But it never looks that way
Because it turns out the only way
For you to be happy is to stop

Denying the reality that you have
To be humble enough
(Be small enough)

To fit through that eye of the needle
That Jesus talked about
And it turns out that

Happiness has a small door
And your ego is too big to fit through it
(It’s all very ironic really)

~.~.~

Hazrat Inayat Khan’s Invocation:

“Towards the one, the perfection of love, harmony and beauty, the only being, united with all the illuminated souls who form the embodiment of the master, the spirit of guidance.”

~.~.~

Hazrat Inayat Khan’s Prescribed Daily Mantra:
“My thoughtful self: Reproach no one. Bear malice towards no one. Hold a grudge against no one. Be wise, tolerant, considerate, polite, and kind to all.”

~.~.~

Gentle Readers,
This looks like it will be a two parter. It was for starters going to be about the interesting intersection of romantic and divine love, as occasioned by a song and comment by Adrienne Shamszad (see just below). But it has segued into time consuming and yes (it’s confession time!) self-promoting asides anent my own poetry. And as my Sufi philosophy is not to undo my ego (Good luck with that!) but rather (in a successive approximation type deal) steer it in the direction of improvement, Es decir emphasize its more wise (and smaller sized) aspects. I believe this is called sublimation.

So, yesterday I was at a gathering of people celebrating the birthday of the Parsi mystic in India, Meher Baba. Readers who have read the “About” section above, or indeed, who have regularly read my blog, will know that I’ve been powerfully influenced by Meher Baba, who “died” in 1969.

At this meeting, at the Baba center in Los Angeles (where I am currently visiting my daughter and friends), a fabulous musician person denombre Adrienne Shamszad played for us, including a wonderfully spiritual song, addressed to God, called “Not Just Roses,” written by Brian Darnell.

You can hear her perform the song here:

When Adrienne credited Brian Darnell with this song, I recognized his name as one who lately has been marvelously supportive of my poetry which I post to friends on Facebook.

You can see Brian perform his (the same) song here:

As I said, Brian (on Facebook) has said encouraging things about some of my recent poems. Not to mention many uses of the “like” button. So, of course now I have an excuse to reprise at least the poems he made comments on, (e. g. “Wow!” “Wonderful poem!” and “Love it!”)

So, here are my poems that had elicited these comments:

PR4–412
The Lioness of Loneliness

It’s ironic all this concern with maintaining
Individuality and so we say so what
If some good essence may survive

What about my ego?
What good is it to existential me
To see some other beauty be immortalized?

What about me?
But as C. S. Lewis said
If you put first things first

You do get those rose things
With their ancillary angel wings
But with second things (like egos) thrown in

But if you put second things first you’re dead
All you get is the lioness of loneliness:
And then you drown in her unquenchable thirst

And,

PR4–425
Some Beautiful Tune Will Come Out of Hiding

I’m getting tired of stepping around stuff
I’m thinking of stepping in it instead
Willy-nilly no worries and all because of those
(Like a rose without the thorn)

Newly now considerations like as if
It’s turned into clouds of swirling color
All infused with angel harmonies with
All ego baggage fainted and harmless

(And comatose too)
On the floor which frees up
(Like the smell of freesias does)
All the angles of the constellations

And with a giant pinwheel galaxy
Eye of-a-hurricane peace inside
And then by golly you can step lively
Yes finally

It’s a no-distance dance and in that trance
Some beautiful tune will come out of hiding
(Just to keep your happy memories company)
And you come out shining and all just-born

And,

PR4–427
Sometimes It Rhymes with Tears

There’s an amazing connection
Between music and poetry
And here’s my evidence:

When I hear beautiful music
I hear powerful words
At least if you define that

By what moves the heart
Because Beethoven was not
The only one who dealt in movements

Whether major or minor
It all came down like the rain and yes
Sometimes it rhymes with tears

 
 

The original idea of this post was the intersection of love for God, and romantic love. Which was occasioned by one of Adrienne’s wonderful songs, and even wonderfuller comment. But that will have to wait til next week.

God be with you,
Eric Halliwell

Ps–the poem at the top was merely liked (i. e. no comment) by Brian. But it is a favorite of mine, and I do need always a poem on top, and of course I favor those which seem to illustrate a Sufi principle. And what could be more Sufi-principled than getting rid of the ego? As Meher Baba once “said,” “I know only one yoga: You go.”